Christopher Chan

The field of biology has much to offer architecture. Biology has, over time, crafted and refined phenomena in our natural world over millions of years. Things like the process of how a silk worm spins highly strong fibers into a sophisticated cocoon could perhaps help to optimize the highly inefficient ways in which we construct our buildings today. This code is a first step into modeling one the way in which things in nature grow. In this case, it is plant like root systems.

Featured / Student Work
Richard Mui

I am interested in developing new hybrid manual and computer controlled construction methodologies for the construction of temporary architecture. The relationship between manual techniques and computer control is a dialogue rather than a process of supersession. In order to promote this relationship, computer controlled machinery should provide visceral feedback in addition to numerical feedback. I believe that input method is integral to achieving this visceral relationship. Gesture control is one of such input methods that I will be exploring.

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Pavel Tsolov

The context of this project originates from the notion of two ideologies:

1.understanding context in Christopher Alexander’s terms in order to solve a problem relating to form:“The context is that part of the world which puts demand on this form;anything in the world that makes demandsof the formis context...We want to put thecontext and the form into effortless contact of frictionless coexistence”.

2.having a tool that would highlight useful services and features in close proximity ofa specific site selected by the user.

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Daniel Shen

Similar to the original Rain Room, the project aims to create an amplified experience to the environment. Human presence (interactions) prevents the rain from falling. The goal is to explore the relationship between human and nature as it becomes increasingly more mediated through technology.

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Brian Liu

The introduction of autonomous driving will have an immense impact on the nature of parking currently in place within our cities. It is predicted that autonomous cars will drastically reduce the number of cars on the road as well as reduce personal ownership of vehicles from the increased sharing of vehicles. As a result, the spatial requirements for the parking of vehicles within cities will be drastically reduced. Autonomous technology will also completely transform how we currently use cars.

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Parshan Fatehi

The focus of this computational exploration was the creation of dynamic façade patterns through vertical rotational elements. This project was initiated with the intent of finding efficient ways of pattern creation, in order to generate a sensitive dialogue between interior and exterior environments - creating a composition between solids and transparencies. The play with angles of rotation was an interesting premise, providing the opportunity to generate patterns based on various degrees of openings, while working within a 3-dimensional environment within Processing.

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Christopher Chan & Kirsten Sheppard

This is a proposal for a bird watching tower that highlights the moments specific to Rattlesnake Point, a harbour for migratory and year-round birds. The Niagara escarpment that runs along the cliff side is paramount in the construction of the tower, along with the views it creates to watch the native birds. As we encroach on their habitat, the utmost concern is given tot he environment. We strive to change the conversation of the relationship between the bird and the watcher to create a site embedded int he forest typology.

Student Work
Di Wang & Howard Won

For a mountain climber, a trip to a nearby mountain trail or cliff is not a mere adventure. It is a ritual; an event in which the routine is conducted by the performer to escape from the urban, sophisticated environment and rediscover his/her experience with nature. He/she specifically chooses the mountain cliffs to perform this activity and not a convenient recreation centre. In doing so, the experience is much more exemplified and this tactile engagement allows a much more explicit and direct interaction with the cliff surface.

Student Work
Andrea Ng & Alice Song

A folklore or common practice found in certain east asian cultures believes that if one holds a secret that becomes unbearable and troublesome, the burden of the secret would have to be relieved. A pilgrim would be made into the forest where the pilgrim find a tree with a hole that ‘speaks to him’. He will then muffle his face in that hole and pour out secret that was burdening him. He then returns to his place among other people and resumes his daily life.

Student Work
Karan Manchanda

This report aims to understand the current siting conditions of Data Centers in the urban context today. The study area chosen is the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA); within which three sites of analysis were selected: Toronto (Downtown Core Area), Hamilton, and the Kitchener Waterloo area.

Using a set of filters and cartographic mapping, the report aims to understand some of the underlying reasoning behind Data and why it lives in certain spaces. The report attempts to take into account both physical and cultural phenomena in determining this information.

Student Work
Simeon Rivier

On June 26th, 1959, the St.Lawrence Seaway & Power project was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, President Dwight Eisenhower, and Prime Minister John Diefenbaker. Construction on the massive civil engineering project had been completed years ahead of schedule, and marked the culmination of decades of planning. The inland shipping route and power project had been the first of its kind ever attempted by two sovereign nations and marked the beginning of a new era in Canada-US trade relations.

Student Work
Stephen Wenzel

This analysis investigates strategies for retrofitting the car-dominated North American city through the identification and design of a place for the bicycle. Looking particularly at Toronto, this study seeks to define a unique territory for the cyclist within the existing urban fabric. In order for cycling to become a mainstream form of transportation, one must look beyond the network of bicycle routes to the development of a strong cycling culture. Cycling can only be made irresistible by creating a unique identity and experience, capable of drawing people to their bikes.

Student Work
Zak Fish

The City of Cambridge is a polarizing figure that has seen tremendous growth in the last half century and at the same time succumb to an extremely high vacancy rate in the historic downtown core. It is simultaneously a picturesque riverside community and nightmare of suburban sprawl.

Student Work
Jonathan Clarke

In the world of property development there are two components in selecting properties. The first is a ‘numbers-game’ and it answers whether or not a certain property is feasible to build upon. The second, more interestingly, though less measurable, concerns the developer’s feel; is the property located in a place where people will want to live? The mixture of both statistical information and subjective estimation are two large parts of successful property development. To negate one or the either is to risk the rate of return.

Student Work
Peter Bachetti

As Toronto’s population anticipates to grow by 23% in the next 20 years the densification of the downtown core becomes problematic. Where and how will this growth be accommodated? At the moment Toronto is building high rise condo towers in order to accommodate these new residents. The issue is that these condo’s are going up faster than the infrastructure that services them. What we don’t want to see is what happened to St. James town. St. James town was the largest high-rise community in Canada. Built in the 1960’s it consists of 19 high-rise buildings (14 to 32 stories).

Student Work
David McMurphy

The intent of this analysis is to begin to develop an understanding of what the condition is between potential development lands and the protected areas of the Green belt. This begins with an experiential analysis of the Greenbelt constructed using Google streetview imagery taken from various points along the interior edge of the Greenbelt’s periphery. 

Student Work
Joanne Lee & Emmeily Zhang

Toronto has often been noted as creative and diverse. The many neighbourhoods of Toronto each have its own characteristics, with different people, scenes and cultural support spaces, demographics and economies. Each one of these neighbourhoods contribute to Toronto in a different way, adding its own input so that the city becomes an aggregation of the characteristics in each different neighbourhood. This analysis tracks from 1996 to 2011, the key factors that influence these areas. 

Student Work
Teresa Tran & Lara Isaac

Storm events in Toronto are the cause of catastrophic environmental and property damage including basement flooding and bypasses of raw sewage. These events are occurring with increasing frequency and severity. The problem Toronto is facing is caused by the compounded problems of insufficient sewer plant capacity, high impermeable ground area, high population density, and a combined storm and sewer system. As population increases, the baseline pressure on the sewage system increases, and storm events, which are also worsening due to global climate change, cause sudden catastrophic stress.

Student Work
Mathew Barker & Yuchen Zhang

This is an analysis of how accessible the Toronto Transit Commission is in serving the city and the effectiveness of the distribution of accessibility. 

Student Work
Kanika Kaushal

The walled city of Old Delhi, India is a complex amalgamation of Mughal, Colonial and post Colonial architecture. This overlap has resulted in a rich urban fabric and networked cultural urbanism that provides the personality traits to the city, which can be defined as it’s urbanity. The thesis aims to decode the microcosm of this urbanity, which can be understood as the result of a morphogenesis that is generated by boundary conditions, a densely packed fabric and urban attractors and connectors.

Student Work
Daniel Malka
Territory, as an incipient design setting, is progressively displacing conventional notions of site within design research and practice, and, with this, the design professions are increasingly exploring their agency as instruments of territorial intervention, formation and reformation; a disciplinary shift witnessed in recent discourses such as Landscape Urbanism, Ecological Urbanism, and Ecological Design.
Student Work
Stephen Wenzel

As Toronto's population continues to grow, the city is faced with many new challenges related to the quality of urban life. Central to overcoming these challenges is a rethinking of urban mobility. As the regionís population grows, city streets have become ever more congested, and commute times have increased exponentially. The city and the regionís governments have called for an end to sprawling development and initiated a policy of densification.

Featured / Student Work